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Peter Losin

For many years (1992-2013) I taught in the Honors College at the University of Maryland, College Park. By day I work in Washington, DC. At Maryland I taught two courses:

Prior to coming to Maryland I taught philosophy at the University of Wisconsin, the College of Charleston, and Gonzaga University. Most of my teaching and writing has focused on Greek philosophy, especially Plato and Aristotle. Some of it is available elsewhere on this website.

I'm also a discographer. Since early 1995 I've maintained a website called Miles Ahead, focused on the music of Miles Davis. If you're interested in Miles Davis (especially his pre-1980s music), take a look. There's a discography, a session list, a query form to search the database, cover art, news about upcoming releases, links to other Miles Davis websites, etc. There's also a separate Charlie Parker session list and a rudimentary discography. I also maintain a desultory list of jazz links if you're interested in jazz more generally.

My other interests you can probably infer from the links at the top of this page.

All of us, if we are of reflective habit, like and admire men whose fundamental beliefs differ radically from our own. But when a candidate for public office faces the voters he does not face men of sense; he faces a mob of men whose chief distinguishing mark is the fact that they are quite incapable of weighing ideas, or even of comprehending any save the most elemental -- men whose whole thinking is done in terms of emotion, and whose dominant emotion is dread of what they cannot understand. So confronted, the candidate must either bark with the pack or count himself lost... All the odds are on the man who is, intrinsically, the most devious and mediocre -- the man who can most adeptly disperse the notion that his mind is a virtual vacuum.

The Presidency tends, year by year, to go to such men. As democracy is perfected, the office represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. We move toward a lofty ideal. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.

H.L. Mencken, "Bayard vs. Lionheart," The Evening Sun, Baltimore (July 26, 1920)

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