Home Work Audio Birding Miles Jazz

Peter Losin

I am an adjunct Senior Lecturer in University Honors at the University of Maryland, College Park. By day I work in Washington, DC. Over the years at Maryland I have taught two courses:

Prior to coming to Maryland I taught philosophy at the University of Wisconsin, the College of Charleston, and Gonzaga University. Most of my teaching and writing has focused on Greek philosophy, especially Plato and Aristotle. Some of it is available elsewhere on this website.

I'm also a discographer. Since early 1995 I've maintained a website called Miles Ahead, focused on Miles Davis's music. If you're interested in Miles Davis (especially his pre-1980s music), take a look. There's a discography, a session list, a query form to search the database, cover art, news about upcoming releases, links to other Miles Davis websites, etc. There's also a separate Charlie Parker session list and a rudimentary discography. I also maintain a desultory list of jazz links if you're interested in jazz more generally.

My other interests you can probably infer from the links at the top of this page.

Until the latest of our world conflicts, the United States had no armaments industry. American makers of plowshares could, with time and as required, make swords as well. But now we can no longer risk emergency improvisation of national defense; we have been compelled to create a permanent armaments industry of vast proportions. Added to this, three and a half million men and women are directly engaged in the defense establishment. We annually spend on military security more than the net income of all United States corporations.

This conjunction of an immense military establishment and a large arms industry is new in the American experience. The total influence -- economic, political, even spiritual -- is felt in every city, every State house, every office of the Federal government. We recognize the imperative need for this development. Yet we must not fail to comprehend its grave implications. Our toil, resources and livelihood are all involved; so is the very structure of our society.

In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist.

We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes. We should take nothing for granted. Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together.

Dwight D. Eisenhower, Farewell Address (January 16, 1961)

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