Home Work Audio Birding Miles Jazz

Peter Losin

For many years (1992-2013) I taught in the Honors College at the University of Maryland, College Park. By day I work in Washington, DC. At Maryland I taught two courses:

Prior to coming to Maryland I taught philosophy at the University of Wisconsin, the College of Charleston, and Gonzaga University. Most of my teaching and writing has focused on Greek philosophy, especially Plato and Aristotle. Some of it is available elsewhere on this website.

I'm also a discographer. Since early 1995 I've maintained a website called Miles Ahead, focused on the music of Miles Davis. If you're interested in Miles Davis (especially his pre-1980s music), take a look. There's a discography, a session list, a query form to search the database, cover art, news about upcoming releases, links to other Miles Davis websites, etc. There's also a separate Charlie Parker session list and a rudimentary discography. I also maintain a desultory list of jazz links if you're interested in jazz more generally.

My other interests you can probably infer from the links at the top of this page.

Of all the enemies to public liberty, war is, perhaps, the most to be dreaded, because it comprises and develops the germ of every other. War is the parent of armies; from these proceed debt and taxes; and armies, and debt, and taxes are the known instruments for bringing the many under the dominion of the few. In war, too, the discretionary power of the Executive is extended; its influence in dealing out offices, honors, and emoluments is multiplied; and all the means of seducing the minds are added to those of subduing the force of the people. The same malignant aspect in republicanism may be traced in the inequality of fortunes and the opportunities of fraud growing out of a state of war, and in the degeneracy of manners and morals engendered by both. No nation could reserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare.

Those truths are well established. They are read in every page which records the progression from a less arbitrary to a more arbitrary government, or the transition from a popular government to an aristocracy or a monarchy.

James Madison, Political Observations, April 20, 1795

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